Posted: March 4, 2016 Contributor: administrator

Why "Female Viagra" Isn’t Working

While for years the idea of a female Viagra has been nothing more than a joke, last year it hit the market but sadly, missed the mark.
This new ‘female Viagra,’ the drug flibanserin, caused quite the media stir when first introduced and approved last August by the FDA.

Women’s advocacy groups applauded the recognition of female sexual dysfunction as a real condition while others saw the whole thing as another new drug being pushed for the treatment of a controversial disorder.

No matter which side of the fence you were on when it came to female Viagra hitting the market, it now seems that collectively we are realizing this drug is not the same as what society hailed “the Magic Blue Pill,” so many years ago.

A new recently published study confirms that, so far, the drug has not yielded many impressive results. In fact, according to the research, women suffering from HSDD or hypoactive sexual desire disorder, didn’t see much of an increase in the enhancement of sexual events or satisfaction during events that did occur.

As if this wasn’t disappointing enough, other unfavorable results were reported. Many women described incidents where they suffered from sleepiness, dizziness, fatigue, and nausea.

The silver lining is that through the success or failure of female Viagra, at least as a society we are growing comfortable discussing women’s enjoyment of sex and acknowledging that lack of enjoyment can be just as debilitating for women as it is for men.

Many therapists and medical professionals were skeptical about the medication since so much of the female sexual experience is based on emotional and mental well being as well as comfort with her partner.

The medication is created to increase the chemicals in the brain that help promote an elevated mood while the male version of the medication works to improve blood flow to specific areas of the body. In theory, this seems like a reasonable way to fix the problem, however, most of us could argue there is much more to enjoying a sexual experience than pure science. Another downside for many women is that alcohol should not be combined with “the little pink pill,” as it has recently been dubbed.

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